Livestream + Zoom 9 60 minute Workshop
Oct 23, 2021 03:25 PM - 04:25 PM(Asia/Ho_Chi_Minh)
20211023T1525 20211023T1625 Asia/Ho_Chi_Minh From Chain Arguments to a Truth-Based Model for Academic Argumentation

Being the second action-research circle, this workshop responds to the learners' request for a working model for academic argumentation after their being introduced to some common argument structures (e.g., convergent, divergent, serial, compound, and complex arguments). While these structures strengthen learners' knowledge on a basic paragraph in academic writing, to increase their confidence in interpreting and producing academic discourses such as primary research which requires analysis of "raw" data, they need a deeper understanding of chain arguments for improved coherence and cohesion and of a popular academic writing frame for logical idea presentation. Accordingly, this workshop focuses on Toulmin's model for academic argumentation, which consists of (1) the claim - the basic assertion of the argument, (2) the evidence - the data supporting the claim, (3) the warrant - the way to "move" from the evidence to the claim, (4) the backing - the basis for the persuasiveness of the warrant, (5) the qualifier - the strength or weakness of a presented claim, and (6) the rebuttal - any exceptional circumstance which invalidates the claim (Toulmin, 2003; Toulmin et al., 1984).

Livestream + Zoom 9 VietTESOL International Convention 2022 convention@viettesol.org.vn


Being the second action-research circle, this workshop responds to the learners' request for a working model for academic argumentation after their being introduced to some common argument structures (e.g., convergent, divergent, serial, compound, and complex arguments). While these structures strengthen learners' knowledge on a basic paragraph in academic writing, to increase their confidence in interpreting and producing academic discourses such as primary research which requires analysis of "raw" data, they need a deeper understanding of chain arguments for improved coherence and cohesion and of a popular academic writing frame for logical idea presentation. Accordingly, this workshop focuses on Toulmin's model for academic argumentation, which consists of (1) the claim - the basic assertion of the argument, (2) the evidence - the data supporting the claim, (3) the warrant - the way to "move" from the evidence to the claim, (4) the backing - the basis for the persuasiveness of the warrant, (5) the qualifier - the strength or weakness of a presented claim, and (6) the rebuttal - any exceptional circumstance which invalidates the claim (Toulmin, 2003; Toulmin et al., 1984).

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University of Languages and International Studies, VNU Hanoi
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