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Zoom 3 Oral Presentations (30 minutes)
Oct 16, 2020 02:55 PM - Aug 31, 2021 03:25 PM(Asia/Ho_Chi_Minh)
20201016T1455 20201016T1525 Asia/Ho_Chi_Minh To what extent do online courses cater for the needs of adult non-English major learners?

When teachers are forced to teach online like during the lock-down because of corona virus, they may wonder how much their courses cater for their learners' needs. To compare and contrast the opinions of non-English major learners of two online courses, one B2 (Common European Framework of Reference, CEFR) course for the undergraduates, who had studied English one semester at university, and the other for post-graduates who took their first English course at university aiming at B1 (CEFR), we collected 33 undergraduates' and 22 post-graduates' answers to questionnaires on their learning purposes and attitudes toward the online course activities as well as the former group's 28 and the latter's 15 questions posted on the groups' learning software, Teams, and raised during the lessons of 12 weeks' learning online. The results show that while the undergraduates appeared to diversify in their perception on the effectiveness of various learning activities, the post-graduates tended to prefer teachers' presentation and explanation of the answers to the skill-practice questions. In other words, the post-graduates seemed to rely more on the teachers' guide while those of the higher levels appeared to be more autonomous in their learning. However, even among the groups of learners heading for B2 levels, there were still ones that need more teachers' supports than others, which required the teacher to diversify class activities and requirements for sub-groups of students.

Zoom 3 VietTESOL International Convention 2021 convention@viettesol.org

When teachers are forced to teach online like during the lock-down because of corona virus, they may wonder how much their courses cater for their learners' needs. To compare and contrast the opinions of non-English major learners of two online courses, one B2 (Common European Framework of Reference, CEFR) course for the undergraduates, who had studied English one semester at university, and the other for post-graduates who took their first English course at university aiming at B1 (CEFR), we collected 33 undergraduates' and 22 post-graduates' answers to questionnaires on their learning purposes and attitudes toward the online course activities as well as the former group's 28 and the latter's 15 questions posted on the groups' learning software, Teams, and raised during the lessons of 12 weeks' learning online. The results show that while the undergraduates appeared to diversify in their perception on the effectiveness of various learning activities, the post-graduates tended to prefer teachers' presentation and explanation of the answers to the skill-practice questions. In other words, the post-graduates seemed to rely more on the teachers' guide while those of the higher levels appeared to be more autonomous in their learning. However, even among the groups of learners heading for B2 levels, there were still ones that need more teachers' supports than others, which required the teacher to diversify class activities and requirements for sub-groups of students.

teacher
,
University of Languages and International Studies, VNU Hanoi
No moderator for this session!
Regional English Language Officer
,
U.S. Department of State
Lead Teacher
,
Australian Centre for Education, IDP Education Cambodia
teacher of English
,
KE SACH HIGH SCHOOL
Ms. Trang Nguyen
Deputy Dean, Division of Foreign Studies
,
SEAMEO RETRAC
Mr. Chantha Phon
English Teacher
,
Hun Sen MeanChey High School
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