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Oct 16, 2020 03:30 PM - Aug 31, 2021 04:00 PM(Asia/Ho_Chi_Minh)
20201016T1530 20201016T1600 Asia/Ho_Chi_Minh Self-efficacy and Task Values in Predicting English Achievement: Toward a Model of Achievement-related Choices

This study explored self-efficacy and task values beliefs and the English achievement of Vietnamese university students. Data were gathered in three universities in Ho Chi Minh City. Individual semi-structured interviews with 9 lecturers, and focus-group interviews with their 72 male and female students were undertaken. The data provided by the lecturers were used to triangulate the data provided by students in focus groups. Interview questions were based on the theoretical framework (expectancy-value theory) which focused on probing students' beliefs about their ability to study English successfully, the values they attach to study English, and their experiences of English classes. Findings provided support for the expectancy-value model. Students' self-efficacy predicted students' achievement in English. Students' values, particularly the utility value of studying English, predicted students' willingness to take courses in English. Students and lecturers agreed that most students were motivated to achieve a level of oral competency in English that would help them get desirable jobs after graduation. However, most English classes devoted little time to this aspect of English and the oral competency of most students was low. There were a number of reasons for this situation. The influence of the family, an integral part of a Confucian-based culture, on students' motivation to study English also was explored in detail.

Zoom 5 VietTESOL International Convention 2021 convention@viettesol.org

This study explored self-efficacy and task values beliefs and the English achievement of Vietnamese university students. Data were gathered in three universities in Ho Chi Minh City. Individual semi-structured interviews with 9 lecturers, and focus-group interviews with their 72 male and female students were undertaken. The data provided by the lecturers were used to triangulate the data provided by students in focus groups. Interview questions were based on the theoretical framework (expectancy-value theory) which focused on probing students' beliefs about their ability to study English successfully, the values they attach to study English, and their experiences of English classes. Findings provided support for the expectancy-value model. Students' self-efficacy predicted students' achievement in English. Students' values, particularly the utility value of studying English, predicted students' willingness to take courses in English. Students and lecturers agreed that most students were motivated to achieve a level of oral competency in English that would help them get desirable jobs after graduation. However, most English classes devoted little time to this aspect of English and the oral competency of most students was low. There were a number of reasons for this situation. The influence of the family, an integral part of a Confucian-based culture, on students' motivation to study English also was explored in detail.

Lecturer
,
The University of Economics and Law (VNU)
Lecturer
,
University of Languages and International Studies, VNU Hanoi
Lecturer
,
University of Languages and International Studies, VNU Hanoi
lecturer
,
TIEN GIANG UNIVERISTY
Deputy head, Department of Foreign Languages
,
University of Economics and Law
Regional English Language Officer
,
U.S. Department of State
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