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Pre-recorded Session Oral Presentations (30 minutes)
Oct 16, 2020 12:00 Noon - Aug 31, 2021 01:45 PM(Asia/Ho_Chi_Minh)
20201016T1200 20201016T1345 Asia/Ho_Chi_Minh Boosting students' autonomy in EFL literature class: with safe environment and student centred approach

The teacher's central role as a lecturer in lessons of literature, especially in a second language, is a commonly accepted norm. However, we argue that literature in a second language can be taught in a learner-centered manner. In this presentation, we describe a lesson of literature in the English language in which the teacher functioned as a facilitator of discussions on the points which would have been conventionally lectured to them; there was no right-wrong judgements of the arguments raised, and rewards were given to open speakers. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of the data collected from class observations and a survey questionaire designed in accordance with the theoretical basis raised by Ames (1985), Wellborn (1991), Brophy (1986) and Connell (1991) show that creating a safe environment and empowering students as the center of their learning process have positive effects on students's motivation and learning process. Stimulated by the discussion points that were either paradoxical or mind-tricking, being assured that neither the teacher nor their classmates would criticize their argument unconstructively, almost all of the students in the literature class enthusiastically expressed themselves, listened to their peers' viewpoints, and reflected on their response to the literary work of concern. The research results suggest that with certain changes in classroom managements, teachers of literature can help students build up their autonomy and simultaneously develop their skills of communication as well as critical and creative thinking.

Pre-recorded Session VietTESOL International Convention 2021 convention@viettesol.org

The teacher's central role as a lecturer in lessons of literature, especially in a second language, is a commonly accepted norm. However, we argue that literature in a second language can be taught in a learner-centered manner. In this presentation, we describe a lesson of literature in the English language in which the teacher functioned as a facilitator of discussions on the points which would have been conventionally lectured to them; there was no right-wrong judgements of the arguments raised, and rewards were given to open speakers. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of the data collected from class observations and a survey questionaire designed in accordance with the theoretical basis raised by Ames (1985), Wellborn (1991), Brophy (1986) and Connell (1991) show that creating a safe environment and empowering students as the center of their learning process have positive effects on students's motivation and learning process. Stimulated by the discussion points that were either paradoxical or mind-tricking, being assured that neither the teacher nor their classmates would criticize their argument unconstructively, almost all of the students in the literature class enthusiastically expressed themselves, listened to their peers' viewpoints, and reflected on their response to the literary work of concern. The research results suggest that with certain changes in classroom managements, teachers of literature can help students build up their autonomy and simultaneously develop their skills of communication as well as critical and creative thinking.

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